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Thursday, April 26, 2007

Iraqi Freedom-Democracy pending


Where my right wingers at baby? Where are the kiwibloggers at? Where is ZB and Radio Live with their claims that the war in Iraq were justified? Where are all those voices? I shout out now and again to them, asking how well Iraq is going, and you get sulky replies, they ignore the issues and they get angry, it’s almost as if they are all embarrassed by supporting something that has become the abortion all those who opposed it knew it would become. At some point my right friends, you have to swallow that bitter medicine that the whole idea was corrupt and your desire to go and shoot up other peoples countries is something you should restrict to the on-line gaming community okay.

So how is that Freedom Democracy going hu? Latest UN report out shows mass civilian deaths, 3000 mass arrests, 37 000 detainments, 200 academics killed since 2003, 54% of Iraqis live on less that a US dollar a day, and 69% unemployment – that’s on top of a lower electricity and water supply than Saddam was able to provide. Iraq, just as Vietnam did, has sucked any moral authority the West ever had, this horror is destroying our ability to do good on the planet, especially at a time when global co-operation IS needed to tackle the issues of Global Warming, extreme poverty, Malaria and AIDS.

UN criticises Iraq human rights
The UN has sharply criticised the Iraqi government's human rights record, in the two months since a security plan was launched in the capital, Baghdad.
The UN mission for Iraq said Iraqi authorities had failed to guarantee the basic rights of about 3,000 people they had detained in the operations. The report said four million Iraqis were at risk because of lack of food. A statement from the office of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki dismissed the report as lacking credibility. The UN Assistance Mission in Iraq report again called for access to Iraqi government files on civilian casualty figures. The Iraqi authorities disputed figures in the previous UN report. The UN said in January that 34,452 civilians were killed and more than 36,000 wounded in 2006. These figures were much higher than any issued by Iraqi government officials. The UN said those figures were provided by Iraqi government ministries.

Mass arrests
The UN report, which covers the period from the 1 January to 31 March 2007, said that some 3,000 thousand people have been arrested in security sweeps since the Baghdad security plan began in mid-February and it condemned Iraq for failing to guarantee due process rights to those taken in. It also criticised the court system in general saying that deliberations at some trials involving life imprisonment or the death penalty only lasted for minutes. Overall, more than 37,000 people are being held in Iraqi and American-run prisons, many of whom have not been charged or sent for trial. The report describes the situation in Iraq as a "rapidly worsening humanitarian crisis". It said daily living conditions were worsening despite billions of dollars earmarked for reconstruction efforts - an estimated 54% percent of Iraqis lived on less than a US dollar a day while the unemployment rate had risen to 60%.

3 Comments:

At 26/4/07 11:22 am, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yes Bomber, where have all those dissenting voices gone? They seemed to disappear right around the time when comment moderation got enabled. What a coincidence!

 
At 26/4/07 12:20 pm, Blogger bomber said...

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Turn it up princess - the only comments that don't get published are the nasty perssonal insults between posters that waste time and deviate from the issues at hand - Christ most of what gets posted on kiwi blog is just the anonymous slagging off - which is a yawn, if you want to post something in support of the war, post it up, to suggest that its because of comment moderation is bullshit, it's because you've run out of excuses to support the war anonymous, what a coincidence!

 
At 27/4/07 6:59 pm, Blogger Julio Pop said...

Love the cartoon...

 

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